Archive for December, 2008

ClickCartPro: Extracting Sales Figures

December 31st, 2008

If you want to get an idea of the stock you’ve sold using the ClickCartPro UK e-commerce software, then you may find the following SQL query useful. Run in phpMySQL to be able to export the data into a spreadsheet.

SELECT SUM(itemquan) as itemssold, count(*) AS timesordered, itemname, itemnum, itemopts, SUM(itemquan)/COUNT(*) AS average FROM `gbu0_orderitems` WHERE FROM_UNIXTIME(epochorder) BETWEEN ‘2007-01-01’ and ‘2008-12-31’ GROUP BY itemnum,itemopts ORDER BY itemssold DESC

What does this mean?
Well, “SUM(itemquan) AS itemssold” grabs the number of items sold, “count(*) AS timesordered” grabs the number of times that item has actually been ordered (as an order could be for 2 or more items), “itemname, itemnum, itemopts” grabs the items name, item number and the options ordered (handy for sizes), “SUM(itemquan)/COUNT(*) AS average” works out the average number of items per order, “FROM `gbu0_orderitems`” says to look at the order table (ok, I’m not distinguishing between cancelled, pending and completed orders at the moment), “FROM_UNIXTIME(epochorder) BETWEEN ‘2007-01-01’ and ‘2008-12-31′” says to only include orders placed between the 1st of January 2007 and the 31st of December 2008 and “GROUP BY itemnum,itemopts ORDER BY itemssold DESC” means group the items for the counts by the item number and options and then order everything by the number of times sold in decending order.

Paypal, ClickAndBuy, Google Checkout, NoChex and Worldpay Fees

December 31st, 2008

Here’s more a reminder to myself and all figures are based off “base rates” currently provided by the various Payment gateways. Check the figures yourself before using them as they may have changed. I can’t accept any liability for how you use this information.

Paypal charge a fixed fee of £0.20 and 3.4% of each transaction. To figure out the gross figure from the net, use the formula: (net+0.20)/(1-(3.4/100)).

Click and Buy charge a fixed fee of £0.35 and 1.9% of each transaction.

Google Checkout charges a fixed fee of £0.15 and 1.5% of each transaction.

NoChex’s Seller Account charges a fixed fee of £0.20 and 2.9% of each transaction.

Worldpay IMA charges a fixed fee of £0.15 and 3.35% of each transaction (along with a £15 monthly fee and £75 setup fee) [note this is for their current “New Business Deal”, normally they charge £30 per month with a £200 setup fee and £4.50% on credit/charge cards and a flat £0.50 on UK Debit Cards: along with £0.06 per transaction for Fraud Detection]

SecureTrading charges 3.29% on each transaction (subject to a minimum fee of £15 per month with a further £15 per month service fee and a one-off setup fee of £300)

» Read more: Paypal, ClickAndBuy, Google Checkout, NoChex and Worldpay Fees

Net: Yahtzee’s Zero Punctuation’s reviews

December 30th, 2008

Ben “Yahtzee” Croshaw has, for around the last year or so, been busy reviewing games under the “Zero Punctuation” monkier for The Escapist. Why that name? Well, he’s a Brit living in Oz and his video reviews have, erm, not a lot of punctuation in them. They are funny, not kid safe, good animation style and they give you a good insight into the games and and…. Meh – it’s nearly 3am in the morning and I just wanted to make a note of the URL so I didn’t have to ask ickle Google every time. It’s http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/zero-punctuation. There. Job Done. That was nice and simple! 🙂 [And, yes, I just managed to stop myself writing this post in his manner of speaking: it was bad enough when I was reading a review of Mirrors Edge and I read it as he reviewed it]

Film and TV: No more Narnia movies and no more Project Runway

December 24th, 2008

In a move designed to upset my my other half on Christmas Eve (mhahaha – it’s my evil deed for the week >-) ), I’m passing on the news that it looks very unlikely that Disney will be making any more Narnia movies (source Defamer.com who cite HollywoodReport.com as a source: but also see NationalPost, CinemaBlend, TotalFilm and E!Online – although they all say pretty much the same thing) and Jezebel is reporting that the new series (6) of Project Runway (which Katy watches a lot) is in legal problems which may stop its production.

Merry Christmas! 😀

Facebook: Copyrighted Content

December 23rd, 2008

I’ve just answered a post on LinkedIn where somebody asked (in the “Casual Games” discussion group):

“There is a hacked flash version of one of our games listed as an application at facebook. I could not find any real support contact information at the facebook website. Just FAQs and canned responses. Do you know anybody working at facebook whom I could contact in this matter? Thank you!”

As I think this may be an issue I’ll have to look at in the future, I’m copying my reply here:

You’ll probably be best sending them a DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) request as detailed on http://www.facebook.com/copyright.php and their form on http://www.facebook.com/copyright.php#/copyright.php?notify=1 . (See also http://www.facebook.com/help.php?topic=copyright )

As long as you provide the full details requested (including detailing the exact URL the content can be found: “A page on your site…” isn’t detailed enough to be an official request). Basically, if the DMCA is sent and is correctly detailed (see http://www.blogherald.com/2008/08/04/dmca-safe-harbor-part-two-the-dmca-checklist/ ), then Facebook may then become liable for any penalties for copyright breaches from 14 working days from that point (as, by notifying them via a DMCA complaint, they then lose the “safe harbour” provision for user generated content).

If the content is hosted by a third party (which may be difficult to tell if it is integrated using the FBML canvas frame method: if it’s integrated via an iFrame, it should be easier to tell: if you want assistance, feel free to contact me with the page on Facebook and I’ll try to help), then you can also contact the third party webhost/ISP for assistance.

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