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Tag: windows

Windows 10 OpenSSH: Migrating from PuTTy: Importing existing keys

This article is the third of a series I’ve written about migrating from using PuTTy on Windows to using the native OpenSSH client now available on Windows 10: you can read the rest of the articles via: Installation Storing keys using the SSH Agent Importing existing keys < You are here Creating a new public/private key pair Other useful OpenSSH commands Configuring Windows Git If you’ve been using SSH for a while, you’ve probably got a variety of private keys in either PuTTy’s own “PPK” format or OpenSSH format. Windows OpenSSH only has support for OpenSSH keys (go figure from the name! 😉 ) and so any PuTTY keys will need converting first. Converting PuTTy PPK Private Keys to OpenSSH format Open PuTTyGen Select “Load an existing private key file” and select your .ppk private key Select from the menu “Conversions->Export OpenSSH key” Save the file. Repeat the previous three steps as necessary for all .ppk files Adding OpenSSH private keys In a normal PowerShell window (i.e. not as administrator), just run: ssh-add C:\Users\userName\.ssh\private_key Of course, changing the path of the key appropriately! Windows appears to accept standard private keys and .pem private keys

Windows 10 OpenSSH – Storing keys using the SSH agent

This article is the second of a series I’ve written about migrating from using PuTTy on Windows to using the native OpenSSH client now available on Windows 10: you can read the rest of the articles via: Installation Storing keys using the SSH Agent < You are here Importing existing keys Creating a new public/private key pair Other useful OpenSSH commands Configuring Windows Git To manage the OpenSSH keys, you need to add them to the ssh-agent (think of it as PuTTY’s Paegant). These keys will then be added to the user’s “Windows registry” and encrypted to their user profile (so, even if the key has an individual password on it, if somebody logins into your machine as user and has access to the registry, then they can access your private keys – if they log in as somebody else, your keys should be safe). This sounds like a security weakness, but is how MacOS and Linux handles keys anyway! Continuing in the Administration Powershell, we’re now going to start the SSH-agent which makes key management much easier: Start-Service ssh-agent If you get an error such as Start-Service : Service ‘OpenSSH Authentication Agent (ssh-agent)’ cannot be started due to the…

Out with the old PC, in with the New Vista Ultimate Machine

Sorry I’ve been absent from blogging for a while – my old Dell Dimension 4550 PC (which has lasted me just 2months shy of 5 years) practically failed. The power fan had been making funny noises for nearly 2 years on and off (rectified by just blindly plunging a screwdriver into the back of the power unit when it made a noise – not at all recommended) and the primary hard drive started failing. Yes, I know I could have just replaced the hard drive (at a cost of around 70 GBP for over 200Gb), but I couldn’t run certain large photo-editing applications on it as it had a measly 3/4Gb of RAM 🙁

So I splurged out with a combination of a new widescreen TFT Samsung SyncMaster 2032BW monitor from PC World – £180 (my old CRT was still in perfect working order after the nearly 5 years usage, but took up so much desk space), an extra 2GB kit (1GBx2), Ballistix 240-pin DIMM RAM from Crucial (£49.99) and the biggest purchase of all – a Dell Dimension XPS 420 with an Intel Viiv Q6600 Quad Core 2.40Ghz Processor, 2Gb RAM (giving a total of 4Gb), 16x DVD+/- RW drive (at long last – the old Dimension could never write DVDs for some reason), 512MB Nvidia Geforce 8800GT card, 2x 500Gb Hard drives and Microsoft Vista Ultimate. Total price (including VAT and delivery) – £760.75.

Was I disappointed and what did I think of Vista?